E-Kidney Newsletter March 2010

E-Kidney Newsletter March 2010

 

Record-Setting Kidney Recipient Celebrates 40th "Transplantiversary" on World Kidney Day

Frank Germinaro, of Kenosha, Wisconsin, will set a record this March as he celebrates a very special anniversary – his 40th year with a kidney donated to him by someone he never knew. Coincidentally, his "transplantiversary" falls on World Kidney Day, March 11.

 

 

 

Love LifeTop 10 Ways to Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

March is National Kidney Month and March 11 is World Kidney Day. You want your kidneys to last you a lifetime, don't you? So show some love for your hard-working kidneys by adopting the National Kidney Foundation's 10-step program for protecting kidney health. Begin with monitoring blood pressure and controlling weight and then move on to the rest of our kidney-healthy tips

 

 

For Developing Nations, Better Lifestyle May Lead to Worse Health

One quarter of the world's adult population has hypertension and now scientists are pointing a finger at urbanization and modern conveniences as a key factor in causing this major health problem. In a special report published in the March issue of American Journal of Kidney Diseases, the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation, researchers project a likely increase in global hypertension rates to 29% by 2025. This report is part of a global forum in recognition of World Kidney Day on March 11.

 

 

A Father's Gift to His Son and Grandsons

Adam Gerstein had been talking to his eldest son about fishing for weeks. They even went to the sporting goods store to pick out a beginner's rod. Then, the late summer trip was postponed. Three days before they were set to leave, Adam was diagnosed with kidney failure and started hemodialysis treatment. To learn more about Adam's journey from dialysis to transplant click here.

 

 

 

Love Your Kidneys Merchandise Hits the Sale Racks

This March, save 25% on all gifts, clothing and educational material at the NKF store in honor of National Kidney Month. Just use promo code e-Kidney310 at checkout and enjoy!

 

 

 

Grizz and Dotcom of "30 Rock" Spread the Word on World Kidney Day

NBC's dynamic duo, Grizz and Dotcom of "30 Rock" teamed up to spread awareness about kidney disease on World Kidney Day, March 11. Don't miss the newest installment of their online video series "Livin' XL with Grizz and Dotcom" on the "30 Rock" web site. In this short clip, the two share some of the vital functions of the kidneys and issue an important call to action, laughing all the while.

 

 

 

NKF Launches 60th Anniversary Fund Campaign

NKF has been bringing help and hope to millions of kidney patients and their families since 1950. As we celebrate our 60th anniversary, we need your help to continue our free early detection screenings, public education programs, research support and more. Support our anniversary campaign, view historical milestones and vote now for your favorite kidney creation as part of our 60th anniversary art contest.

 

 

 

Waldorf Chicken Wrap from Food Network host and New York Times Best Selling Author Ellie Krieger

She's a New York Times bestselling author and a registered dietitian, in addition to being host of Food Network's Healthy Appetite. Krieger, who has a family history of kidney failure, provided this crunchy waldorf chicken wrap recipe in honor of National Kidney Month. This flavorful dish is diabetic-friendly and a perfectly healthy way to serve supper on the go.

 

 

 


 

 

Record-Setting Kidney Recipient Celebrates 40th "Transplantiversary" on World Kidney Day

Frank Germinaro, of Kenosha, Wisconsin, will set a record this March as he celebrates a very special anniversary – his 40th year with a kidney donated to him by someone he never knew. Coincidentally, his "transplantiversary" falls on World Kidney Day, March 11.

Frank, who outlived the hospital where he was transplanted, never dreamed he'd have to spend a passing moment thinking about things like Medicare or gray hair. Diagnosed with kidney disease as an infant, he was a chronically ill child who by age 19 was hooked up to a dialysis machine. His parents – a factory worker dad and homemaker mom with an 8th grade education – had to train to become dialysis technicians since there was no dialysis unit in the area. The local Italian community mobilized and a dialysis unit was established in Kenosha because of Frank.

Today, the married father of four grown children who's enjoyed a career as a school principal with a sideline as conductor/musical director of the Kenosha Pops/Concert Band, is still overwhelmed with gratitude for his donor's family. He received the kidney of a 13-year-old girl who died of a brain tumor and thinks about her family's sacrifice every single day. "She was a young girl with a future ahead of her and I was a young guy who needed a future and I've been able to have one because of her," says Frank.

Frank gives back through his leadership in the National Kidney Foundation. He's served on the NKF's Patient and Family Council and on a special workgroup that developed practice guidelines for kidney specialists. As proud owner of one of the longest-lasting transplanted kidneys in the U.S., Frank's perspective on patient care is unique. This March 11, on World Kidney Day, Frank will celebrate his special anniversary by spreading the word about the importance of early detection for kidney disease and the life-saving power of organ donation.

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Top 10 Ways to Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

March is National Kidney Month and March 11 is World Kidney Day. You want your kidneys to last you a lifetime, don't you? So show some love for your hard-working kidneys by adopting the National Kidney Foundation's 10-step program for protecting kidney health. Begin with monitoring blood pressure and controlling weight and then move on to the rest of our kidney-healthy tips

 

  • Monitor blood pressure and cholesterol.
  • Control weight.
  • Don't overuse over-the-counter painkillers.
  • Monitor blood glucose.
  • Get an annual physical exam.
  • Know if chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes or heart disease runs in your family. If so, you may be at risk.
  • Don't smoke.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Follow a healthful diet.

Talk to your doctor about being tested for CKD if you're at risk.

The National Kidney Foundations urges all Americans to love their kidneys. To learn more about CKD risk factors, prevention and treatment, click here.

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For Developing Nations, Better
Lifestyle May Lead to Worse Health

One quarter of the world's adult population has hypertension and now scientists are pointing a finger at urbanization and modern conveniences as a key factor in causing this major health problem. In a special report published in the March issue of American Journal of Kidney Diseases, the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation, researchers project a likely increase in global hypertension rates to 29% by 2025. This report is part of a global forum in recognition of World Kidney Day on March 11.

"Hypertension is a leading cause of death and disability around the world. Major complications include kidney failure, cardiovascular disease and stroke– all largely preventable conditions," said Dr. Kerry Willis, Senior Vice President of Scientific Activities of the National Kidney Foundation.

The report reviewed data from fourteen separate studies of a total of 160,000 people that examined the prevalence of hypertension in diverse countries and populations around the world. These include China, India, Pakistan, Egypt, Ghana, Mexico, Paraguay, Latin America and the U.S. In these studies, hypertension was defined as a blood pressure reading of 140/90.

A number of the studies analyzed in this report attributed the increasing rates of hypertension in developing regions to lifestyle changes related to industrialization and urbanization. It was noted that increased income, while enhancing overall quality of life, often leads to the adoption of an unhealthy lifestyle that includes transition from traditional rural diets (high in fiber) to a diet rich in salt, saturated fat and poor-quality carbohydrates such as those found in fast food. Urbanization is also often accompanied by reduced physical activity due to sedentary, desk-job, occupations that contribute to increased hypertension risk.

Other factors that play a role in rising hypertension rates include low birth weight, lack of awareness and lack of access to medical care.

Racial and Ethnic Differences

The report found that hypertension in the black population in the United States and West Indies is higher than in the white population and also is much higher than that observed in sub-Saharan Africa. Authors hypothesize that this difference is related to the urbanization effect over the last 300 years on blacks that emigrated to the U.S.

Additionally, one study analyzed in this report found that most whites are resistant to the effects of salt on blood pressure, whereas blacks are salt-sensitive, which leads to increased hypertension rates in African Americans.

Addressing Global Hypertension

"Screening for hypertension is straightforward," said Dr. Willis. "With appropriate measures in place, the disease potentially is preventable, even in countries with limited resources."

Strategies to address the rising rates of hypertension and prevent its complications include the following:

  • Assessing estimated glomerular filtration rate and urine protein in those with hypertension to promote early detection of kidney disease

  • Targeted training of general practitioners in optimal management of hypertension

  • Reducing salt intake through voluntary agreements with industry (i.e. makers of pickled foods, soy sauce, cereals, baked goods) and legislation to mandate salt reduction

  • Promoting awareness of healthy lifestyle changes such as increasing exercise and decreasing consumption of calorie and fat rich foods

  • Increasing awareness of the harmful effects of smoking

In the U.S., the National Kidney Foundation is addressing hypertension as a major risk factor for kidney disease by offering free kidney screenings through its Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEPTM) for those with hypertension and diabetes. KEEP screenings are offered throughout the year and will be provided in at least 50 cities across the country on or around World Kidney Day, March 11.

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A Father's Gift to His Son and Grandsons

Adam Gerstein had been talking to his eldest son about fishing for weeks. They even went to the sporting goods store to pick out a beginner's rod. Then, the late summer trip was postponed. Three days before they were set to leave, Adam was diagnosed with kidney failure and started hemodialysis treatment. To learn more about Adam's journey from dialysis to transplant.

Adam and his wife immediately began the search for a living donor. Several generous family members, friends and acquaintances came close, but were ruled out for medical reasons. During this time, Adam's dialysis treatments became very difficult, due to a rare condition that prevented the use of anti-clotting agents and the search for a donor took on an even greater urgency.

Then, one week before Christmas, Adam's father, Bob, became determined to be the donor. Just in case, a friend of Adam's was designated as a back up. By mid – January, Bob had completed his pre-surgery medical testing and was deemed a match. On January 21, 2010 Bob gave Adam the ultimate gift-- his left kidney. Two days later, Bob walked out of New York-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center. He was followed two days after that by Adam.

"With one son who was a preemie, there were nights in the NICU where I would have given anything to make my son better, so my dad's gift is all the more meaningful to me," says Adam.

Bob remains his normal, humble self. "I never expected that our active, athletic, hardworking 35-year-old son would need much more than babysitting so he and his wife could enjoy the occasional night out. But when he did need more, I was so grateful that I could be there for him."

"My surgery was a snap," says Bob, "...made easy by the encouragement, support and competence of the outstanding team of professionals at the hospital – from the surgeons and anesthetists to the coordinators, nurses, technicians and social workers. The experience was overwhelmingly positive."

Adds Adam, "My surgery was much easier than I expected and thanks to my dad and the great team at the hospital, I'm looking forward to the first of many fishing trips with my boys and many more family milestones. I can't promise my fastest run at the National Kidney Foundation U.S. Transplant Games this summer, but we'll all be happy to be there."

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Waldorf Chicken Wrap from Food Network host and New York Times Best Selling Author Ellie Krieger

She's a New York Times bestselling author and a registered dietitian, in addition to being host of Food Network's Healthy Appetite. Krieger, who has a family history of kidney failure, provided this crunchy waldorf chicken wrap recipe in honor of National Kidney Month. This flavorful dish is diabetic-friendly and a perfectly healthy way to serve supper on the go.

Waldorf Chicken Wrap

Meaty Chunks of chicken, crispy juicy apple, and the rich crunch of walnuts folded into a thick creamy dressing form an indulgent combination of flavors and textures that, when tucked into a wrap, is satisfaction you can hold in your hand.

¼ cup walnuts
1/3 cup plain Greek-style nonfat yogurt
1 tablespoon mayonnaise
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme
1 cup cubed cooked chicken breast (about 1/2 pound)
1 medium apple, unpeeled and diced (about 3/4 cup)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
4 large leaves romaine lettuce, rinsed and patted dry
4 whole –wheat wrap breads (about 9 inches in diameter)

Toast the walnuts in a dry skillet over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, until fragrant, 3 to 5 minutes.

In a medium bowl, stir the yogurt, mayonnaise, lemon juice, mustard and thyme until smooth. Fold in the chicken, toasted walnuts and apples. Season with salt and pepper.

To make each wrap, place 1 lettuce leaf on 1 wrap bread, then spoon about 3/4 cup of the chicken mixture on top. Fold the bread about an inch over each end of the filling, then roll up. Serv e or wrap in foil to go.

Makes 4 Servings

Serving size: 1 wrap

Per serving:
Calories 290
Total fat 11 g
Saturated fat 1 g
Mono fat 1.5 g
Poly fat 5 g
Protein 19 g
Carb 29 g
Fiber 3 g
Cholesterol 35 mg
Sodium 240 mg

Excellent source of niacin, protein

Good source of manganese, fiber, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B6

Note: If you have diabetes, you should use the total carbohydrates listed in the nutrition info to "budget" for the wrap.

This recipe is provided courtesy of Ellie Krieger and So Easy, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.