National Kidney Foundation Launches National Kidney Early Evaluation Program

New York, NY
April 15, 2000

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) today announced the national launch of its Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP), a free health screening program designed to help identify and educate individuals who are at increased risk for developing kidney disease. KEEP focuses on reaching high-risk individuals — those with known diabetes and/or hypertension or those who have first-degree relatives with hypertension, diabetes or chronic kidney failure — with the purpose of delaying or preventing the development of chronic kidney disease.

KEEP screening participants receive educational material and those who have kidney disease or are at risk for kidney disease are referred for appropriate medical care.

“We know that if we start early with education, detection and if necessary, medical intervention, we can often postpone the onset or even prevent kidney disease or kidney failure from ever developing,” says Dr. Joel Kopple, National Kidney Foundation president.

“We know that if we start early with education, detection and if necessary, medical intervention, we can often postpone the onset or even prevent kidney disease or kidney failure from ever developing,” says Dr. Joel Kopple, National Kidney Foundation president.

More than 300,000 Americans are currently being treated for chronic renal failure, a condition that requires dialysis or a kidney transplant for patient survival. The number of individuals affected by kidney failure has been increasing by 6 to 8 percent each year.

KEEP is funded through an educational grant from Ortho Biotech. Satellite Laboratories will serve as the laboratory sponsor of the program.

To receive a 2000 schedule of planned KEEP screenings in your area or for a free brochure on kidney function and kidney disease, contact the National Kidney Foundation at (800) 622-9010.

The National Kidney Foundation is dedicated to preventing kidney and urinary tract diseases, improving the health and well-being of individuals and families affected by these diseases and increasing the availability of all organs for transplantation.