National Kidney Foundation Releases “Diabetes and Kidney Disease: A Guide for American Indians and Alaska Natives”

New York, NY
August 15, 2000

One in every five American Indians and Alaska Natives has diabetes, which is the number one cause of kidney failure in the United States today. This high incidence of diabetes causes American Indians and Alaska Natives to develop kidney failure three times more often than whites, says the National Kidney Foundation (NKF). To help people in these communities learn more about two of the diseases that disproportionately affect them, the National Kidney Foundation has created a new educational brochure,“Diabetes and Kidney Disease: A Guide for American Indians and Alaska Natives.”

Written in question-and-answer format, “Diabetes and Kidney Disease” provides important information about the prevention, control and treatment of both diseases. Readers will learn the symptoms of diabetes, the early signs of kidney damage and treatment options for kidney failure.

Though all American Indians and Alaska Natives are at increased risk for developing Type II diabetes, both diabetes and kidney disease can be prevented. For a free copy of “Diabetes and Kidney Disease: A Guide for American Indians and Alaska Natives,” contact the National Kidney Foundation at (800) 622-9010.

The National Kidney Foundation is the nation’s leading voluntary health agency dedicated to preventing kidney and urinary tract diseases, improving the health and well-being of individuals and families affected by these diseases, and increasing the availability of all organs for transplantation.