Study Suggests a Little Wine May be Good for Your Kidneys

Las Vegas, NV- Moderate wine consumption could help keep the kidneys healthy, and may protect the heart in patients who already have kidney disease, according to new findings presented here at the National Kidney Foundation's 2014 Spring Clinical Meetings.

Tapan Mehta, MD, of the University of Colorado-Denver, and his colleagues found that people who drank less than one glass of wine a day had a 37 percent lower prevalence of chronic kidney disease than those who drank no wine at all. Among study participants who had chronic kidney disease, those who drank less than a glass of wine daily were 29 percent less likely to have cardiovascular disease than non-wine drinkers.

Dr. Mehta and his colleagues used 2003-2006 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey on 5,852 individuals, 1,031 of whom had chronic kidney disease.

Thomas Manley, director of scientific activities at the National Kidney Foundation, said, "Similar to previous studies showing that moderate wine consumption appears to impart some health benefit by lowering the risk of heart disease and diabetes, this study suggests an association between moderate wine consumption (< 1 glass/day) and lower rates of chronic kidney disease."

Moderation is the key for kidney patients when it comes to alcohol consumption, with a few caveats, Manley said. "Excess alcohol consumption has definitely been shown to have negative effects on kidney function. Alcohol can also worsen hypertension, a major cause of chronic kidney disease, so those with poorly controlled hypertension should definitely limit the amount of alcohol they consume. It's also important to consider the nutritional contents of the various alcoholic drinks to be sure they comply with the prescribed renal diet."

The National Kidney Foundation is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk. For more information, visit www.kidney.org.