A to Z Health Guide

Using Your Smartphone For Medical Emergencies

By Roberta Reed, kidney advocate and volunteer
 
Imagine this: you have suffered an accident which has left you seriously injured—or in some way you have become incapacitated. Because of your condition, the doctors and nurses who are working to keep you alive aren’t able to easily contact your next of kin for your health history and potential allergies. It’s a scary scenario to say the least, especially for those with special medical needs.
 
While it may be something we don’t want to think about, it’s a scenario that we all need to consider—mainly because there is something that we can do to help it!
 
In the past, people have opted to handwrite their emergency contact information and put it in their wallet, but these days, more and more are relying solely on their phones.
 
You see, most smart phones come equipped with an emergency contact and medical history feature, called MEDICAL ID. This nifty tool allows anyone who comes into contact with your phone when you’re unresponsive (i.e. a medical professional), to quickly learn your basic medical history, as well as your preferred emergency contact, within seconds.
 
Before cell phones were smartphones, many people got into the habit of creating an ICE (in case of emergency) contact in their phone, but this caused a lot of trouble as the information was not useful unless the phone was unlocked. If you are still using this outdated system, it’s definitely time to make the switch!

Another way technology is helping to save lives

Not only does Medical ID give smartphone owners peace of mind, it has also become an invaluable tool for those working in the medical community.
 
Hospitals and emergency responders in years past had no way of knowing who their patients were or how to contact their next of kin or their medical history!  Now they do and you have the ability to make sure they have the information they need if they need to save your life.
 
People don’t realize that something called a “Medical ID” can be setup on your iPhone and/or ICE on your Android phone if you have the health app (comes free with phone).
 
Are you willing to take two minutes of time to make this simple change that can save your life?
 
Click the links below for a two-minute demonstration of how to do it.  This information is well worth sharing too—with everyone you know.
 
 
Save a life!
 
 
 

The information shared on our websites is information developed solely from internal experts on the subject matter, including medical advisory boards, who have developed guidelines for our patient content. This material does not constitute medical advice. It is intended for informational purposes only. No one associated with the National Kidney Foundation will answer medical questions via e-mail. Please consult a physician for specific treatment recommendations.