E-Kidney Newsletter March 2010

E-Kidney Newsletter April 2010

 

Four Ways to Eat Healthier if You Have Kidney Disease

The nation's sports fans are focused on the Final Four in April, but for those with chronic kidney disease, National Food Month is an opportunity to learn about the first four dietary nutrients to monitor with these tips from the National Kidney Foundation.

 

 

Double DonationDouble Donation: Husband and Wife Each Give Gift of Life

When Marcus and Monica Gilbert decided to purchase a Charley's Grilled Subs franchise in a food court at a Utah mall, the idea of saving two lives was not in their business plan. Yet, that is exactly what resulted. Together, this couple, married seven years, has shared many successes --owning a thriving business, raising four healthy children and, within a 16-month span, giving the gift of life through kidney donation to two individuals.

 

 

Living donors at the
NKF's 2008 U.S. Transplant Games

NKF Launches New Living Donor Council

From Haitian earthquake relief to local food banks, Americans can always be counted on to give. Yet the 84,000 people on the national list for lifesaving kidney transplants are still waiting for the gift of life. As the number of living kidney donors declines nationwide, the National Kidney Foundation has created a new Living Donor Council, launched in April in honor of Donate Life Month, to identify unmet needs, develop programs to meet those needs and advocate for donors and potential donors.

 

 

Obesity May Affect Kidneys Differently in Whites and Blacks

Obese African-Americans may be more vulnerable to the effects of chronic kidney disease than obese whites, new findings from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP®) show.

 

 

NKF Launches New Dialysis Education Program

Helping patients make informed choices about their own health is the rationale behind the new Medicare pre-dialysis education benefit and NKF has developed a comprehensive curriculum to assist professionals in providing this patient education to CKD Stage 4 patients. NKF's newest program, Your Treatment, Your Choice was designed to meet guidelines for reimbursement under the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 (MIPPA), and is free to qualified professionals. To find qualified providers near you or to learn more about the program click here .

 

 

Save 25% and Stay Dry in April

Sing in the rain this April as you protect yourself from the heavy showers with this durable and attractive NKF umbrella from the "Love Your Kidneys" collection. Use promo code ekidney410 at checkout to save 25% on every item in the NKF online store.

 

 

Crunchy Apple Fennel Salad

Dress up your Spring table with this beautiful, crunchy and kidney-friendly Apple Fennel Salad from the Kidney Kitchen.

 

 

 

 

Celebrating 60 years!

Donate to the NKF's 60th anniversary fund campaign now, or better yet, become a volunteer fundraiser today.

 

 

 

Chef Govind Armstrong Cooks for Kidney Disease

Tune in to Bravo on April 7 at 11/10 PM Central to watch Chef Govind Armstrong compete for the National Kidney Foundation on season two of the hit reality competition show "Top Chef Masters." In this premiere, Armstrong will discuss his connection to the kidney cause and why he has decided to cook for the NKF.

If Armstrong wins this season, a donation will be made to his charity of choice --the National Kidney Foundation.

 

 

 


 

 

Four Ways to Eat Healthier if You Have Kidney Disease

The nation's sports fans are focused on the Final Four in April, but for those with chronic kidney disease, National Food Month is an opportunity to learn about the first four dietary nutrients to monitor with these tips from the National Kidney Foundation.


1. Protein

Getting the right amount of protein is important to your overall health and how well you feel. Your body needs the right amount of protein to:

  • Build muscles
  • Repair tissue
  • Fight infections

Your doctor may recommend that you follow a diet that has controlled amounts of protein. This may help decrease the amount of wastes in your blood and may help your kidneys to work longer.

Protein comes from two sources. You will need to get some protein each day from both of these sources:

  • Animal sources: eggs, fish, chicken, red meats, milk products and cheese
  • Plant sources: vegetables and grains

2. Sodium

Kidney disease, high blood pressure and sodium are often related. Therefore, you may need to limit the amount of sodium in your diet. One tactic to accomplish this is to learn how to read food labels so you can make lower sodium choices when you shop for foods. Sodium is a mineral found naturally in foods. It is found in large amounts in table salt and in foods that have added table salt such as:

  • Seasonings like soy sauce, teriyaki sauce and garlic or onion salt
  • Canned foods and some frozen foods
  • Processed meats like ham, bacon, sausage and cold cuts
  • Salted snack foods like chips and crackers
  • Most restaurant and take-out foods
  • Canned or dehydrated soups (like packaged noodle soup)

3. Potassium

Potassium is an important mineral in the blood that helps your muscles and heart work properly. Too much or too little potassium in the blood can be dangerous. One of the kidney's jobs is to regulate the amount of potassium in your body and eliminate excess in the urine. When your kidneys begin to lower in function you may need to assist them by monitoring potassium in your diet. Foods that contain higher amounts of potassium are fruits and vegetables.

4. Phosphorous

Your kidneys also have the job of removing excess phosphorus from your blood. A high blood phosphorus level may cause your skin to itch and your bones to lose calcium which increases the risk for breaks. If you have CKD stage 3-5, eating fewer foods that are high in phosphorus, is very important and will help lower the amount of phosphorus in your blood.

Phosphorus is found in large amounts in the following:

  • Dairy products such as milk, cheese, pudding, yogurt and ice cream
  • Dried beans and peas such as kidney beans, split peas and lentils
  • Nuts and peanut butter
  • Beverages such as hot chocolate, beer and dark cola drinks

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Double Donation: Husband and Wife Each Give Gift of Life

When Marcus and Monica Gilbert decided to purchase a Charley's Grilled Subs franchise in a food court at a Utah mall, the idea of saving two lives was not in their business plan. Yet, that is exactly what resulted. Together, this couple, married seven years, has shared many successes --owning a thriving business, raising four healthy children and, within a 16-month span, giving the gift of life through kidney donation to two individuals.

Like many married couples, Marcus and Monica balance their days between running after their four children -- Jessica, Taylor, Christian and Emma –and managing a business. Unlike many married couples, they found the time and opportunity to each donate a kidney.

It all began when Marcus hired 17-year old Juan Delgado to work at one of his Charley's Grilled Subs franchises. Marcus was determined to help Juan and his family, knowing that he had a difficult schedule to work around while undergoing thrice-weekly dialysis treatment. He even arranged a few fundraisers at Charley's to defray Juan's rising medical costs. But Marcus was still not satisfied with his results and decided to take his efforts one step further and get tested to become his employee's kidney donor. After hearing that he was a perfect match, Marcus and Juan underwent successful kidney transplant surgery in September 2008.

"I felt I was in a good spot to donate and that I couldn't pass up on the opportunity of giving someone so young his life back," said Marcus.

After watching her husband donate his kidney without a hitch, Monica decided she too wanted to be a living donor. So she underwent tests with the goal of donating her kidney to anyone in need.

A few weeks later, Monica was notified that she was a match for a 44-year old named Pepe Sione Lee, a husband and father from Salt Lake City. Pepe's kidneys had failed due to diabetes and he had been receiving dialysis treatment for 18 months. On February 11, 2010, Monica successfully donated a kidney.

In recognition of Monica's gift, Pepe and his wife are planning a luau party this summer—just around the time when Juan plans to graduate from high school. Like both their kidney recipients, Marcus and Monica have returned to their daily routines with plenty of energy, which they will use to continue to chase their children around the house.

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NKF Launches New Living Donor Council

Living donors at the
NKF's 2008 U.S. Transplant Games

From Haitian earthquake relief to local food banks, Americans can always be counted on to give. Yet the 84,000 people on the national list for lifesaving kidney transplants are still waiting for the gift of life. As the number of living kidney donors declines nationwide, the National Kidney Foundation has created a new Living Donor Council, launched in April in honor of Donate Life Month, to identify unmet needs, develop programs to meet those needs and advocate for donors and potential donors.

"Our goal is to remove the barriers to donation that currently exist, improve the donation process and expand the resources and services available to potential donors. The Living Donor Council will serve at the ‘voice for living donors,'" says John Davis, National Kidney Foundation CEO.

Specific barriers that will be addressed through comprehensive education, support and legislative advocacy programs include the financial impact as well as the physical and emotional issues surrounding donation and the knowledge gap regarding available treatment.

The NKF has appointed a 10-member Executive Committee of living kidney donors and professionals to guide the work of the Living Donor Council. The Executive Committee will work to make recommendations from NKF's ground-breaking End the Wait! initiative a reality.

"Making sure that living donors don't have to think about the repercussions of taking time off from work and that they have access to life, health and disability insurance is a top priority as is ensuring that they receive top medical care and long term tracking of their health," says Davis.

The number of live kidney donors decreased from an all time high of 6,647 in 2004 to 6,387 in 2009, even thought the list of people who need a kidney grows daily

"Through education and advocacy for legislation that ensures the safety, health and job security of living donors, we are sure we can make a difference," says Davis.

For more information on the Living Donor Council visit www.livingdonors.org

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Obesity May Affect Kidneys Differently
in Whites and Blacks

Obese African-Americans may be more vulnerable to the effects of chronic kidney disease than obese whites, new findings from the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP®) show.

KEEP® is a free, community-based program that has screened more than 150,000 people across the U.S. at high risk for chronic kidney disease since its launch in 2000. In the new study, Dr. Andrew S. Bomback of Columbia University Medical Center in New York City and his colleagues looked at 37,107 obese KEEP participants (52 percent white, 48 percent black) to investigate whether there might be ethnic differences in how obesity affected kidney function. The study appears in the March issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation.

While whites were more likely than African Americans to have components of the metabolic syndrome—a group of heart disease risk factors including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high blood glucose—black individuals were more likely to show signs of failure in kidney hormone function, Dr. Bomback and his team report.

And while the kidneys of obese whites were more likely than those of obese blacks to show severe impairment in blood filtering capacity, blacks were more likely than whites to be excreting abnormal amounts of protein in their urine, which is a sign of ongoing kidney damage and increased cardiovascular risk.

Dr. Bomback and his colleagues also found that among people with more advanced kidney disease, blacks were more likely than whites to have anemia and excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone, which is responsible for regulating levels of calcium in the body.

The findings might help explain why blacks and whites with chronic kidney disease have different long-term outcomes, Dr. Bomback and his colleagues say.

Individuals are considered to be at high risk for chronic kidney disease if they have diabetes or hypertension, or they have a close relative with diabetes, hypertension, or kidney disease. Many people with chronic kidney disease aren't aware of it, notes Dr. Peter McCullough, vice chair of KEEP. He points out that about a quarter of the people identified as having kidney disease through KEEP were "completely unaware" that they had any kidney problems. "The majority of chronic kidney patients diagnosed through KEEP have not seen a nephrologist, suggesting that their own primary care physicians may be unaware of it as well," he adds.

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Crunchy Apple Fennel Salad

Dress up your Spring table with this beautiful, crunchy and kidney-friendly Apple Fennel Salad from the Kidney Kitchen.

Apple Fennel Salad
6 servings

1 bulb of fennel, (use only the bottom round portion) sliced very thin 2 red apples, cored and sliced very thin 1/2 cup of lemon juice

Dressing
2 tablespoons pear, apple cider or red wine vinegar
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
3 tablespoons, canola oil
3 tablespoons, chicken or vegetable stock
1 teaspoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons marjoram

Mix the all of the dressing ingredients together first. Dip the sliced apples in lemon juice to prevent them from turning brown. Mix the sliced fennel, apples and dressing together and serve immediately.

Analysis:

Calories 110, total fat 7g, saturated fat 0.5 g, monounsaturated fat 4 g, polyunsaturated fat 2.1 g, cholesterol 0.0 mg, calcium 29.7 mg, sodium 62 mg, phosphorus 29.6 mg, potassium 250 mg, total carbohydrates 13.1g, dietary fiber 2.7 g, sugar 7.1 g, protein 1 g

This recipe was submitted by CKD patient Chef Duane Sunwold.