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This activity will cover a wide array of issues regarding protein nitrogen balance and adequacy. The relationship between protein intake and urea nitrogen appearance will be discussed, as well as the clinical and nutritional implications of urea kinetics and dialysis adequacy.
Date: Feb 15, 2017
Protein and phosphorus are not "hard" on normal kidneys. The kidney has many normal mechanisms for dealing with normal amounts of protein and phosphorus that is taken in with the diet. As kidneys fail, especially after they reach advanced stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), protein and phosphorus are not handled as well. If someone has Stage 4 or 5 CKD, with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of less than 30 milliliters per...
Blog: Ask the Doctor Blog
The only obvious symptoms may be swelling in the feet and generalized swelling in the body. You may also notice bubbles in your urine as you pass your urine into the toilet.  Many people with protein in the urine have no symptoms.
Blog: Ask the Doctor Blog
If you have early stage kidney disease, a healthcare professional may recommend a low protein diet. When you lower the amount of protein in your diet, you may also find the calories are lower. It’s especially important to get enough calories to maintain a healthy weight at this time.  ...

By Linda M. Ulerich, RD

We all need protein in our diet every day. Protein is used to build muscle and fight infection and is made up of different amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. There are twenty different amino acids and nine of them are considered to be “essential” amino acids because the body can’t create them on its own. These must be obtained through dietary sources and protein in our diet can come from both...

We all need protein in our diet every day. Protein is used to build muscle and fight infection and is made up of different amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. There are twenty different amino acids and nine of them are considered to be “essential” amino acids because the body can’t create them on its own. These must be obtained through dietary sources and protein in our diet can come from both animal and plant...

You should speak to a Renal Dietitian to create a meal plan that would work best for you based on your weight, lab values, medications and health history. He or she should be able to calculate how much protein you need on a daily basis. Dialysis treatments remove protein and amino acids from your body, thus patients undergoing dialysis typically need to include more protein in their diet. Adequate protein intake is required to build muscle,...
What is protein?

Protein is an important nutrient that helps build muscle, repair tissue, and fight infection.

Protein is made from amino acids. Amino acids are like building blocks that combine to form many different types of protein.  Your body makes some of the amino acids you need.  The rest comes from the foods you eat.  This is called dietary protein.

Why do I need dietary protein?

Your body cannot make all...

New York, NY (March 21, 2013) – Pee in a cup and you might get a clue as to how much longer you will live. A new report published online today in the National Kidney Foundation's American Journal of Kidney Diseases shows a strong correlation between levels of protein in the urine, or proteinuria, and mortality.

"Our report shows that both men and women with higher levels of proteinuria had substantially reduced life...

A: Whey protein is very similar to animal protein when it comes to kidney disease.  The most complete protein is egg white.  It has all the necessary amino acids for a healthy diet.  We recommend varied proteins from varied sources, including animal proteins such as beef, pork, fish and poultry.  Vegetable proteins are also very good in small amounts, being careful not to take in too much phosphorus.  I recommend you seek counseling from a...
Blog: Ask the Doctor Blog

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