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A normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is greater than 60 milliliters per minute per 1.73 meters squared. Hence, your test is just below the normal range. You may need to have this re-tested after you have hydrated yourself.
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If you have only one kidney, then you have chronic kidney disease by definition. A normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) for someone with only one kidney should be greater than 60 milliliters per minute per 1.73 meters squared and there should be no protein in the urine.
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I am unable to make a diagnosis based on the information presented. You should ask your physician for the cause of your kidney disease and ask about any suggestions to preserve the kidney function that you have. It is usually not possible to significantly improve kidney function in chronic kidney disease, but this should be explored with your physician.
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If these readings have been present for greater than 3 months, then you have early Stage 3 chronic kidney disease. You should continue to see your physician and have this tested intermittently. If you have high blood pressure or diabetes, these should be carefully controlled.
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In this case, I would discuss this with your physician. We do not have a standard formula for mixed white and black race. You can use either test, but there has been no study to examine this question
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An estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 46 milliliters per minute per 1.73 meters squared should not cause nausea. Nausea can be seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) but is most common in advanced CKD with eGFR's less than 30.
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Kidney disease is commonly without any symptoms at all. Hence, the answer to your question is "Yes" kidney disease can be present without any symptoms.
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The decision to do dialysis in not based on any percentage of kidney function. The decision to start dialysis requires a discussion between you and your nephrologist as to when the risks of dialysis are less than the benefit you will receive from treatment with dialysis therapy. You should continue this discussion with your nephrologist.
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It will help avoid dehydration. I recommend that you follow your doctors advice.
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I am not aware of any evidence that acupuncture will benefit chronic kidney disease (CKD).
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