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Lance Mason's kidney journey began before he was even born–both his parents had kidney disease and had gone through dialysis and kidney transplants. Growing up, he went to doctor's appointments with his parents, attended dialysis sessions, and shared information about kidney disease with friends and family. 

Despite Lance's involvement in the kidney disease world, he never expected to become a kidney patient. That all changed...

"Sarah Hyland - Primetime Emmy Awards 2016 After Party In Los Angeles"

Trigger warning: This article discusses suicidal ideation. If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or visit National Suicide Prevention Lifeline for more...

Here are the inspiring journeys of six people with kidney disease who have made history. These stories serve as a reminder that kidney disease doesn't have to stop you. They also underscore the need to raise awareness about health disparities within the Black/African American community.

The statistics

Black/African American people make up about 13% of the total population but account for 30% of the people with kidney failure in the...

By Lauren Drew, Congressional Relations Director 

Many patients are not informed when they first begin dialysis that there are more options beyond the traditional in-center, in-a-chair, 3 times a week system. Only 14% of patients on dialysis in the US are using at-home options, despite evidence showing that it may be a better option for some patients1.

The Improving Access to Home Dialysis Act (H.R. 8075) was...

A recent survey of people on hemodialysis found that itching, also known as...

In 2021, there were 786,000 patients1 living with kidney failure, yet less than 25,0002 received a transplant that year. In 2022, the U.S. finally reached 25,000 kidney transplants3 in one year, but there are still an estimated twelve people dying each day without the opportunity to receive a life-saving transplant. 

No one should die while waiting for a kidney, but there aren't enough organs to meet current or future...

According to the CDC1, every year, more than 356,000 people in the US suffer from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), where their heart unexpectedly stops beating. Saving their lives is a race against time, but the odds are daunting. 60% to 80% of people who experience SCA die before ever reaching the hospital. Is there a key to stopping this life-threatening condition?

A groundbreaking study2 of...

En 2021 había 786,000 pacientes1 con insuficiencia renal, pero menos de 25,0002 recibieron un trasplante ese año. En 2022, Estados Unidos finalmente llegó a 25,000 trasplantes de riñón3en un año, pero todavía hay unas doce personas que mueren cada día sin la oportunidad de recibir un trasplante que salva la vida.

Nadie debería morir mientras espera un riñón, pero no hay suficientes órganos para satisfacer las necesidades actuales...